I have something to tell you.


Vanessa McMouse december 2020


Writing the book Lie For Me started three years ago, I wrote a quick draft of the storyline and abandoned the idea soon after that. It was only when I stumbled across an article by an American reporter in late 2018 about a prominent public figure. When I decided to revisit the draft storyline, I wrote a long time ago.


The exposure about this prominent figure came out when the #metoo movement was at its height and had a lot of media coverage. What intrigued me in this particular case was the fact that respectable members of society went out of their way to protect the perpetrator instead of the victims. To add more salt to their wounds, this person was welcomed back, with open arms and people accepted his donation despite his crimes.



This article hit too close to home for me personally. Until now, for the last three years, my life has been a nightmare dressed like a daydream. Someone my family and I trusted turned our lives upside down by threatening to harm us, to the point where the police were advising us to move for our safety. What got me through this, difficult period of my life was writing.



I decided to rewrite the plot from a murder mystery to something completely different. In summary, Lie For Me is about a young female teacher, who leaps at an opportunity of a lifetime to teach at a top private school in New York. However, soon after taking the job, she discovers all that glitters is not gold. Caught between a hard place and a rock, what will the young female teacher do? Sacrifice her career, to tell the truth, or turn a blind eye and take the schools' secret to her grave


It was essential to me when I started writing this book for it to be from a different point of view other than the victim or prepetrator. In t

he opening chapters of Lie For Me, we are slowly introduced to the problem as an observer through the main character but not given the full scale of the problem this is done, intentionally to build up the suspense. The sequencing of the book is sort of like the movie Jaws soundtrack by The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. Where you know, something big is about to happen. However, it is not the anticipation that has your stomach knots, it is the wait that is giving you butterflies.



When shown the full picture of the problem, we the audience are not surprised but are still caught off guard. That's when the plot twists begin when the veil is lifted. What do we do now? In the book, we as the reader will see what kind of choices the characters make whether to be a bystander, an enabler or turn a blind eye.



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